Volume 10.

Masthead

The Journal's 2013–14 volume was lead by Editor-in-Chief David Perl and his team. We invite you to explore the content; then contribute to the conversation. Submit a response, report a development, or pen the next article.

 
 

10.1

Publish in Winter 2014. The first article examines whether governors should serve on the boards of incorporated universities as ex officio members, using Pennsylvania State University as a case study to analyze the fiduciary responsibilities of directors under corporate law. The second article highlights the difficulties of adopting the International Financing Reporting Standards worldwide. The third article questions the mandate by some governmental entities that malfeasant corporations designate a chief compliance officer and separate the compliance gatekeeping function from the legal department. The first student note explores the JOBS Act and details the differences between funding portals and broker-dealer registration. The second student note proposes to replace the money-transmitting state licensing framework with a single, federal licensing requirement in order to increase market competition and provide more reasonable prices to consumers. The third student note explores whether California intended to create a right of action for a plaintiff seeking to sue an employer for an AB 1844 violation and the remedies that are available to the plaintiff. Finally, the fourth student note examines trade secret ownership pertaining to independent contractors in the tech development industry.

More detailed summaries below, as well as links to respond. What will you contribute? Responses will be published in our online pocket part on a rolling basis. 

 

10.2

Published in Summer 2014. The first article examines whether exculpatory repossession clauses could survive judicial scrutiny under Revised Article 9. The second article discusses pretrial bargaining under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, and fundamental problems with Deferred Prosecution Agreements (“DPA”) and Non-Prosecution Agreements (“NPA”). The first student note explores microlending as a tool for economic recovery and growth in California. The second student note considers the effect of applying a gift tax on 501(c)(4) contributions to curtail anonymous political funding.  The third student note explores the use of court-appointed damages experts to provide juries with a sound methodology for assessing damages. The final student note discusses difficulties courts face in interpreting the Supreme Court’s intent when applying the Morrison test to derivative transaction cases.  

More detailed summaries below, as well as links to respond. What will you contribute? Responses will be published in our online pocket part on a rolling basis.